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Reinforced Concrete Vol. I – Part II

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By Dr. H. J. Shah

12th Edition 2021 (Paperback)
ISBN : 9789385039485
536 + 24 = 560 Pages
Size : 235 mm × 25 mm × 170 mm
Weight : 0.750 kg

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Description

This book presents the basic principles involved in Analysis and Design of Reinforced Concrete
Structures. This 12th edition of Vol. I has been thoroughly revised and extensively enlarged in two
parts. Almost all chapters are revised with adding a plenty of new matter, examples and figures. Mix
design as per latest IS:10262 with excel programs is added. A number of excel programs have been
added to clarify the subject matter and design the elements of structure. As per prevailing market
conditions the default combination of materials is revised to M20 grade concrete and Fe 500 grade
steel, however, the other combinations of materials have not been completely ignored.
The outline of the book “Reinforced Concrete Vol. I – Part II” is as mentioned below:
Chapter 17 contains design of columns used in framed structures. The design interaction diagrams
are derived and excel program is prepared for rectangular columns.
Chapter 18 emphasis on Design of Foundations: Fundamentals. Moreover this chapter is extensively
revised and soil design is sufficiently elaborated.
Chapter 19 on Isolated Footings for walls and columns subjected to various types of loads. Discusses
topics on axially loaded pad and sloped footing; eccentrically loaded footings; isolated slab and beam
type footing; footing for multi-storeyed building columns and also gives an excel program on design
of an isolated footing.
Chapter 20 discusses Combined Footings for two axially loaded columns and also explains strap,
strip and raft foundations. Also includes the guidelines to design a combined footing for general
loading system.
Chapter 21 elucidates topics on Pile Foundations such as loads on pile groups; soil design of a pile;
structural design of a pile; design of a pile cap.
Chapter 22 Circular raft foundations with annular and solid rafts used under circular peripheral
columns or RCC shafts are discussed.
Chapter 23 on Retaining walls includes design of cantilever and counterfort retaining walls.
Chapter 24, 25 and 26 deals with variety of roof coverings, viz., Circular, Ribbed and Waffle slabs;
Flat slabs and domes are discussed in these chapters.
Chapter 27 discusses the empirical designs of both, the deep beams and corbels
Chapter 28 Grid or Coffered Floors are designed by using classical analysis.
Chapter 29 Formworks: Basic formworks used on general sites for slabs, beams and columns are
discussed in this chapter.
Chapter 30. Detailing of Reinforcement: This chapter explains basic style of practical RCC structural
drawings.
Now this book “Reinforced Concrete Vol. I – Part II”, in its 14 Chapters and Appendix contains:
261 Neatly drawn sketches
037 Useful tables
086 Design problems
085 Questions at the end of the chapters
002 Excel programs
106 Short questions with answers.
The book in the present form will prove to be extremely useful to the students preparing for the
Degree examinations in Civil Engineering and Architecture of all the Indian Universities, Diploma
examinations conducted by various Boards of Technical Education, Certificate Courses as well as for
the A.M.I.E., U.P.S.C., G.A.T.E., I.E.S., and other similar competitive and professional examinations.
It should also be an immense use to practicing Civil Engineers.

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Weight 0.750 kg
Dimensions 23.5 × 2.5 × 17 cm
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Content

17 : COLUMNS
18 : DESIGN OF FOUNDATIONS: FUNDAMENTALS
19 : ISOLATED FOOTINGS
20 : COMBINED FOOTINGS
21 : PILE FOUNDATIONS
22 : CIRCULAR RAFT FOUNDATIONS
23 : RETAINING WALLS
24 : CIRCULAR, RIBBED AND WAFFLE SLABS
25 : FLAT SLABS
26 : DOMES
27 : DEEP BEAMS AND CORBELS
28 : GRID OR COFFERED FLOORS
29 : FORMWORK
30 : DETAILING OF REINFORCEMENT
APPENDIX C : SHORT QUESTIONS WITH ANSWERS
INDEX

Details Content

CHAPTER 17 COLUMNS

17-1. Introductory
17-2. Loads and displacements for building columns
(1) Vertical gravity loads (dead and live loads)
(2) Horizontal loads (wind and earthquake loads)
17-3. Classification of columns
17-3-1. Braced and unbraced columns
(1) Braced column
(2) Unbraced columns
17-3-2. No–sway and sway columns
17-3-3. Tied, spiral and composite columns
(1) Tied columns
(2) Spiral columns
(3) Composite columns
17-3-4. Short and long columns
(1) Short columns
(2) Long (slender) columns
17-4. Reinforcement requirements
(1) Longitudinal reinforcement
(2) Transverse reinforcements
17-5. Minimum eccentricity
17-6. Assumptions made for design
Short columns
17-7. Axially loaded tied columns
17-8. Axially loaded spiral columns
17-9. Short eccentrically loaded columns —
Uniaxial bending
Uniaxial bending
(1) N.A. Lies outside the section
(2) N.A. Lies inside the section
17-10. Modes of failure in combined axial load and uniaxial bending
(2) Balanced failure
(3) Tensile failure
17-11. Types of problems
17-12. The interaction diagram
17-13. Stress block parameters when n.A. Lies outside the section
17-14. Construction of interaction diagrams
17-14-1.Pure axial load
17-14-2.Axial load with uniaxial moment
17-15. Neutral axis (n.A.) Lies outside the section
17-16. Neutral axis (n.A.) Lies inside the section
17-17. Charts for compression with bending
17-18. Tension with bending
17-19. Use of interaction diagram
17-20. Unsymmetrically reinforced columns with
Uniaxial eccentricity
Define
(1) General method
(2) Approximate method
17-21. Using an excel program to draw an interaction diagram of
A given rectangular column
17-22. Short eccentrically loaded columns: biaxial bending
Slender columns
17-23. Slender columns
(1) Unsupported length
(2) Effective length
(3) Radius of gyration
(4) Slenderness ratio (S.R.)
(5) Short and long columns
(6) Slenderness limits for columns
17-24. Effective length calculations
Method 1
Method 2
17-25. Lengths of column
(1) Floor height (h)
(2) Length of column (l)
(3) Unsupported length of column (l)
(4) Effective length of column (lef)
17-26. Design of slender columns
(1) Braced columns
(2) Unbraced columns

17-27. Design and detailing of a practical column
EXAMPLES 17

CHAPTER 18 DESIGN OF FOUNDATIONS: FUNDAMENTALS

18-1. Introductory
18-2. Classification of found ations
(1) Flexible and rigid foundations
(2) Shallow and deep foundations
18-3. Types of footings
(1) Continuous wall footing
(2) Isolated footing
(3) Combined footing
(4) Strap footing
(5) Strip footing
(6) Raft foundation
(7) Pile foundation
18-4. R.C.C. Footings
(1) Column/wall — footing connection
We may state
(2) Aspects of footing design
Soil design
18-5. Soil exploration
18-6. Depth of foundation
18-7. Cohesive and cohesionless soils
(1) Cohesive soil
(2) Cohesionless soil
(3) C-f soil
18-8. Modes of soil failure
(1) Catastrophic collapse
(2) Excessive settlement
18-9. Types of shear failures of soil
(1) General shear failure
(2) Local shear failure
(3) Punching shear failure
(4) Intermediate (mixed mode) failure
18-10. Vertical stress distribution
18-11. Contact pressure distribution under rigid footings
18-12. Net safe bearing capacity (net sbc) of soil
(1) The ultimate bearing capacity
(2) Net ultimate bearing capacity
18-13. Settlement of soil
18-14. Safe bearing pressure (sbp) on soil
18-15. Allowable bearing capacity (abp) on soil
18-16. Calculation of net safe bearing capacity (net sbc) of
Soil effective surcharge and effective surcharge/
Overburden pressure
Net sbc
18-17. Simplified method of soil design for axial,
Inclined and eccentric loads
18-17-1.Transfer of loads from column to soil
18-17-2.Resultant loads at the base of footing
18-17-3.Goal of design
18-17-4.Selection of abp (allowable bearing pressure)
18-17-5.Footings subjected to axial loads
18-17-6.Footing subjected to axial loads and moments
(1) Uniaxial moment
(2) Biaxial moment
Loss of contact
18-17-7.Footing subjected to horizontal loads
18-17-8.Use of passive pressure for resisting sliding
(1) Cohesionless soil
(2) Cohesive soil
18-17-9.Use of slab tie and beam ties for
Resisting sliding
Structural design

18-18. Selection of plan dimensions
18-19. Upward soil pressure
18-20. General soil design considerations
(1) Uniform settlement
(2) Uniform pressure
(3) Non-uniform pressure
18-21. Footing for eccentrically loaded columns
(1) Concentric footing
(2) Eccentric footing
Soil design
18-22. General structural design considerations
18-23. Concrete pedestal
18-24. Transfer of load at the base of column
Dowels
(1) Bearing strength
(2) Bond strength
Practical consideration
EXAMPLES 18

CHAPTER 19 ISOLATED FOOTINGS

19-1. Introductory
19-2. Wall footings
19-3. Axially loaded pad footing
(1) Proportioning the size
(2) Bending moment
(3) Nominal reinforcement
(4) Development length
(5) Shear
(6) Deflection
(7) Cover
(8) Reinforcement requirements
(9) Transfer of load from column to footing
(10) Weight of the footing
19-4. Axially loaded sloped footing
19-5. Eccentrically loaded footings
(1) Uniaxial moment
(2) Biaxial moment
19-6. Fixing up footing dimensions
19-7. Isolated slab and beam type footing
19-8. Footing for multi-storeyed building columns
19-9. Excel program for design of an isolated footing
EXAMPLES 19

CHAPTER 20 COMBINED FOOTINGS

20-1. Combined footings
20-2. Combined footing for two axially loaded columns
20-3. Strap footings
20-4. Strip footings
20-5. Combined footing for generalised load system
(1) General
(2) Collinear columns
(3) Drawing co-ordinate axes
(4) Soil design
20-6. Raft foundation
20-7. Closure
EXAMPLES 20

CHAPTER 21 PILE FOUNDATIONS

21-1. Introductory

21-2. Loads on pile groups
(1) Axial loads on a group of vertical piles
(2) Moment on a group of vertical piles
(3) Horizontal load
(4) Design of a pile
21-3. Soil design of a pile
21-4. Structural design of a pile
21-5. Design of a pile cap
General
Examples 21
CHAPTER 22 CIRCULAR RAFT FOUNDATIONS
22-1. Introduction
(1) Annular raft
(2) Solid raft
Annular raft
22-2. Formulae for annular raft soil design of
An annular raft
Define
(1) Raft positioning
(2) Upward pressures
22-3. Formulae for annular raft
(1) Axial load
Constants
Radial moments
Tangential moments
(2) Applied moment m
Radial shears
Tangential shears
Constants
Radial moments
Tangential moments
R-T moments
22-4. Design for flexure and shear
(1) Flexure
(2) Shear
(3) Locations for analysis and design
Solid raft
22-5. Solid raft
(1) Axial load
(2) Applied moment m
Constants
EXAMPLES 22

CHAPTER 23 RETAINING WALLS

23-1. Introductory
23-2. Types of retaining walls
(1) Gravity wall
(2) Cantilever wall
(3) Counterfort wall
(4) Buttress wall
(5) Bridge abutment
(6) Gabion walls
(7) Box culvert
23-3. Earth pressure on walls
23-4. Calculation of earth pressure
(1) Cohesionless soil
(2) Cohesive soil
23-4-1. Earth pressure of submerged soil
23-4-2. Earth pressure due to surcharge
23-5. Drainage of retaining walls
23-6. Stability requirements
(1) The restoring moment (stabilizing moment) should be
more than the overturning moment so as to
Get a factor of safety not less than 1.55
(2) The vertical pressure on the soil under the base should
not exceed the permissible bearing pressure of soil
(3) The restoring force against sliding should be more than
the sliding force so as to get a factor of safety not less
than 1.55
(4) Check for combined effect of vertical and horizontal loads
Cantilever retaining wall
23-7. Preliminary proportioning of cantilever retaining wall
(1) Height of wall
(2) Base width and position of stem on the base of footing
(3) Thickness of base slab
(4) Thickness of stem
23-8. Design of a cantilever retaining wall
(1) Design of stem
(2) Design of heel
(3) Design of toe
(4) Base key
(5) Minimum reinforcement in walls with variable depth
Counterfort retaining wall
23-9. Counterfort wall

23-10. Stability and design procedure
(1) Stability
(2) Stem
(3) Base
(4) Counterforts
EXAMPLES 23

CHAPTER 24 CIRCULAR, RIBBED AND WAFFLE SLABS

Circular slabs
24-1. Introductory
24-2. Analysis
24-3. Introductory
24-4. Proportioning the dimensions
24-5. Analysis and design procedure
(1) Analysis
(2) Design
Waffle slabs
24-6. Two-way spanning ribbed slabs: waffle slabs
EXAMPLES 24

CHAPTER 25 FLAT SLABS

25-1. Introductory
(1) Flat slab with no drop and no column head
(2) Flat slab without drop and column with column head
(3) Flat slab with drop and column with column head
25-2. Column and middle strips
(1) Column strip
(2) Middle strip
(3) Panel
25-3. Proportioning of flat slab elements
(1) Thickness of flat slab
(2) Drops
(3) Column head
25-4. Design methods for flat slabs
(1) Direct design method (D.D.M.)
(2) Equivalent frame method (E.F.M.)
Direct design method (D.D.M.)
25-5. Total design moment
25-6. Distribution of moments in slabs
Interior negative design moment
Positive design moment
Exterior negative design moment
(1) Moments in column strip
(2) Moments in middle strip
25-7. Effect of pattern loading
(1) By increasing the flexural stiffness of columns
(2) By increasing the positive moment
25-8. Transfer of floor loads into columns
(1) Transfer of vertical load
(2) Transfer of moment
25-9. Design for shear
(1) Calculation of shear stress
(2) Permissible shear stress
25-10. Provision of reinforcement
25-11. Moments in columns
EXAMPLES 25

CHAPTER 26 DOMES

26-1. Introductory
26-2. Stresses in domes
26-3. Formulae for forces in spherical domes
(1) Uniform loads as on dome
(2) Concentrated loads w on crown
26-4. Design of a spherical dome
26-5. Section design for pure tension
26-6. Formulae for forces in conical domes
EXAMPLES 26

CHAPTER 27 DEEP BEAMS AND CORBELS

27-1. Introduction
Deep beams
27-2. Definitions

(1) Deep beams
(2) Effective span
(3) Lever arm
27-3. Design and details of reinforcements
(1) Design of reinforcements
(2) Details of reinforcements
Corbels
27-4. Corbels
27-5. Shear friction
27-6. Corbel dimensions
(1) Width of the corbel
(2) Width of the base plate
(3) Span of the corbel
(4) Depth d at root of the corbel
(5) Depth d1 at the outer edge of contact area
27-7. Design of a corbel
(1) Primary tension reinforcement
(2) Shear reinforcements
EXAMPLES 27

CHAPTER 28 GRID OR COFFERED FLOORS

28-1. Introduction
28-2. Analysis of grid floors
28-3. Plate theory
(1) The flexural rigidities can be obtained from:
(2) The torsional rigidity of rectangular section can be
obtained from
EXAMPLES 28

CHAPTER 29 FORMWORK

29-1. Introductory
29-2. Requirements for good formwork
29-3. Materials for forms
(1) Timber
(2) Steel
29-4. Choice of formwork
29-5. Loads on formwork
29-6. Permissible stresses for timber
29-7. Design of formwork
29-8. Shuttering for columns
29-9. Shuttering for beam and slab floor
29-10. Practical considerations
29-11. Erection of forms
29-12. Action prior to and during concreting
29-13. Striking of forms
EXAMPLES 29

CHAPTER 30 DETAILING OF REINFORCEMENT

30-1. Introduction
30-2. General informations for drawing
30-3. Drafting
30-4. Columns framing plan and foundation details
General notes
30-5. Columns details
Kicker
30-6. Slabs and beams details
30-7. Closure
APPENDIX C : SHORT QUESTIONS WITH ANSWERS
INDEX

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