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PROGRAMMING IN C

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By JIGNESH SHAH

1st Edition 2006 (Paperback)
ISBN : 9788185594637
448 + 16 = 464 Pages
Size : 17 cm × 24 cm × 2 cm
Weight : 0.610 kg

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Description

C language is very important in Computer Programming. This book is divided into 12 chapters
and 5 Appendix. So that students can get detailed, systematic and step by step knowledge of
the subject. In each chapter all the points are explained in simple language with illustrations.
Salient features of the book are as follows:
* 527 Examples (including programs with output)
* 79 Important tables
* 376 Exercise Questions.
watch, output, trace into, step over, getch( ), clrscr( ), gotoxy( ), kbhit( ), delay( ), time structure,
merits and demerits of string input library function are discussed for the first time in this book.
In addition to this, ‘C’ fundamentals, operators, input-output library functions, loops, string handling library functions, pointers, multifile programming, file handing functions are discussed in
detail in easy to understand style.
In Chapter 10 Object oriented programming is discussed in detail and in Chapter 11 special programs are given. By studying these programs, programmer can become expert in ‘C’ language.
In this book following Appendices are explain in detail:
* Appendix A – Algorithm and Flow-chart,
* Appendix B – Bit level Programme
* Appendix C – ASCII Character Set
* Appendix D – Operators precedence table and
* Appendix E – Library Functions.
This book is prepared for both learners as well as for experienced programmers. This book is
very useful for Degree and Diploma students of Engineering, M.C.A., P.G.D.C.A., B.C.A., B.Sc.,
I.T.I., Commerce, Management and students learning Programming Languages in private Institutes.

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Weight 0.61 kg
Dimensions 17 × 2 × 24 cm
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Content

1 : C’ FUNDAMENTALS
2 : OPERATORS AND INPUT-OUTPUT FUNCTIONS
3 : STATEMENT, BRANCHING AND LOOPING
4 : ‘C’ FUNCTIONS – USER DEFINED FUNCTION
5 : STORAGE CLASSES
6 : ARRAY
7 : POINTERS
8 : STRUCTURES AND UNIONS
9 : WORKING WITH FILES
10 : LINK LIST
11 : INTRODUCTION TO OBJECT ORIENTED
PROGRAMMING
12 : SPECIAL PROGRAMS
APPENDIX A : FLOWCHART AND ALGORITHM
APPENDIX B : BIT OPERATORS
APPENDIX C : ASCII CHARACTER SET TABLE
APPENDIX D : OPERATOR PRECEDENCE TABLE
APPENDIX E : STANDARD LIBRARY FUNCTIONS
INDEX

Content Details

Chapter 1 ‘C’ FUNDAMENTALS

1-1. Introduction
1-2. Features of ‘C’
(1) General purpose language
(2) Structured programming language
(3) Middle level language
(4) Portable language
(5) Free style language
(6) Case sensitive language
1-3. Advantages of ‘C’
1-4. Structure of a ‘C’ program
(1) #include (4) Braces
(2) Comments (5) printf
(3) main( ) (6) Semicolon
1-5. getch( ) and clrscr( )
1-6. Watch, output and trace into
(1) Setting watches
(2) Trace into
(3) Output screen
1-7. Writing, compiling and running a ‘C’ program
1-8. Character set
(1) Letters
(2) Digits
(3) Special characters
(4) White space characters
1-9. Keywords
1-10. Identifiers
1-11. Data–types
(1) void
(2) Integral data–type
(3) Floating–point types
1-12. Constants
(1) Integer constants
(2) Floating–point constant
(3) Character constant
(4) String constant
1-13. Symbolic constants
1-14. Escape sequence
1-15. Variables and their declarations
Declaration of variable
1-16. Short-cut keys
(1) Curser movement commands
(2) Block commands
(3) Other important commands
Exercises

Chapter 2 OPERATORS AND INPUT-OUTPUT FUNCTIONS

2-1. Introduction
(1) Operators on the basis of number of operands
(2) Functionality of operators
2-2. Arithmetic operators
Precedence of Arithmetic operators
2-3. Unary operators
(1) Unary Minus
(2) Increment operator and decrement operator
(3) Size of operator
Precedence of Unary operators
2-4. Relational operators
Precedence of Relational operator
2-5. Equality operators
Precedence of equality operators
2-6. Logical operators
(1) AND Operator
(2) OR Operator
(3) NOT Operator
Precedence of logical operators

2-7. Assignment operators
(1) = : assign the value
Difference between Assignment Operator (=) and Equality
Operator (==)
(2) +=, – =, *=, /= and %= : add then assign, subtract then
assign, multiply then assign, divide then assign and evaluate
remainder then assign
2-8. Conditional operator
2-9. Precedence of operators
2-10. Library functions
(1) Input/Output Operation
(2) For Operation on character
(3) For operation on string
(4) For Arithmetic operations
2-11. Type conversion
(1) Implicit conversion
(2) Explicit conversion
2-12. Input–output functions
2-13. getcharacter function
2-14. putcharacter function
2-15. scanf function
2-16. printf function
2-17. getstring function
2-18. putstring function
2-19. field – width
Rules for field-width
2-20. Typical programs
Exercises

Chapter 3 STATEMENT, BRANCHING AND LOOPING

3-1. Introduction
(1) Condition checking
(2) Body of the loop
3-2. if statement
(1) Simple if statement
(2) if……else statement
(3) Compound if statement
(4) Nested if……else statement
(5) else if ladder
3-3. For loop
(1) Initialization
(2) Condition checking
(3) Increment / Decrement
Nesting of for loops
Programs of nested for loop
3-4. While loop
Nesting of while loop
3-5. Do–while loop
(1) for and do–while
(2) while and do–while
Nesting of do – while loop
3-6. The switch statement
3-7. Break statement
3-8. exit function
3-9. Continue statement
3-10. Goto statement
3-11. gotoxy function
3-12. Special programs
Exercises 3

Chapter 4 ‘C’ FUNCTIONS – USER DEFINED FUNCTION

4-1. Introduction
4-2. Needs/importance/advantages
4-3. Function Definition
(1) First line (2) Body of the function
4-4. Return statement
4-5. Calling a function

4-6. Function prototyping
(1) No argument, No returntype
(2) No argument, With returntype
(3) With argument, Without returntype
(4) With argument, With returntype
4-7. Passing arguments to a function
(1) Call by value
(2) Call by reference
4-8. Nesting of functions
4-9. Recursion
4-10. Typical Programs
4-11. Macros
Exercises 4

Chapter 5 STORAGE CLASSES

5-1. Introduction
5-2. Types of storage classes
5-3. Automatic variables
5-4. External variable
Difference between external variable definition and declaration
Inherent dangers of external variables
5-5. Static variable
5-6. Register variable
5-7 Multi-file Programming
Rules associated with the use of functions in multi-file
programming
Variables in multi-file programs
How to run multi-file programs
Exercises 5

Chapter 6 ARRAY

6-1. Introduction
6-2. What is an array?
6-3. Defining one-dimensional array
6-4. Initializing arrays
6-5. Processing an array
6-6. Passing array to function
6-7. Two-dimensional arrays
6-8. Initializing two-dimensional arrays
6-9. Array and strings
6-10. Declaration and initialization of strings
6-11. How to input strings?
6-12. How to print strings to the screen?
(1) %s
(2) putchar( )
(3) puts( )
6-13. Finding length of a string
6-14. Copying strings
6-15. Comparison of two strings
6-16. Reversing a string
6-17. Concatenating strings
6-18. String handling functions
(1) String length functions
(2) String copy functions
(3) String compare functions
(4) String reverse functions
(5) String concatenate function
(6) String lower functions
(7) String upper functions
(8) String set function
(9) Bytes swapping function
6-19. Typical programs
Exercises 6

Chapter 7 POINTERS

7-1. Introduction
7-2. What is pointer?
7-3. Declaration and initialization of pointers
(1) char *ch
(2) int *number
(3) float *fptr
7-4. ‘&’ and ‘*’ operators
(1) &
(2) ‘*’
7-5. Pointer and one-dimensional arrays
7-6. Pointer and two-dimensional array
7-7. Dynamic memory allocation
Allocating a block of memory
Freeing the used space
Modifying block size
7-8. Operations on pointers
7-9. Pointer and functions
7-10. Functions returning pointers
Exercises 7

Chapter 8 STRUCTURES AND UNIONS

8-1. Introduction
8-2. Structure declaration
8-3. Dot operator
8-4. How to give values to structure members?
8-5. Structure initialization
8-6. Using unary operators with structures
8-7. Using assignment operator with structure
(1) Assigning complete structure variable to another structure
variable
(2) Assigning values in the individual members of the
structure variable
8-8. Array of structures
8-9. Arrays within structures
8-10. Structures within structures – nested structure
8-11. Structures and functions
8-12. Structures and pointers
How pointers to structure variables declare?
How a structure is accessed using its pointer?
8-13. typedef feature of ‘C’
8-14. Unions
8-15. Typical programs
(1) Structure time
(2) gettime( )
(3) kbhit( )
(4) delay( )
Exercises 8

Chapter 9 WORKING WITH FILES

9-1. Introduction
9-2. Opening a file
9-3. Closing a data-file
9-4. File input/output functions
(1) putc function
(2) getc function
(3) fputc function
(4) fgetc function
(5) fputs function
(6) fgets function
(7) putw function
(8) getw function
(9) fwrite function
(10) fread function
(11) fprintf function
(12) fscanf function

9-5. Opening a file in append mode
9-6. A program to copy a file
9-7. Error handling during file I/O operation
(1) feof( ) function
(2) ferror( ) function
9-8. Movement of file pointer
(1) fseek function
(2) ftell( ) function
(3) rewind function
Exercises 9

Chapter 10 LINK LIST

10-1. Introduction
10-2. Linked list
10-3. Types of linked list
Two way list
Circular linked list
10-4. Basic list operation
10-5. Creating a linked list
10-6. Traversing a linked list
10-7. Searching a linked list
10-8. Insertion into linked list
10-8-1. Insertion at first node in the list
10-8-2. Insertion at last in the list
10-8-3. Insertion at middle in the list
Algorithm for inserting node at middle of the list
Deletion of node at first in link list
Doubly linked linear lists
Steps for Algorithm

Chapter 11 INTRODUCTION TO OBJECT ORIENTED
PROGRAMMING

11-1. Introduction
11-2. Needs for object oriented programming
(1) Procedural languages
(2) Division into functions
(3) Problems with structured programming
(4) Data undervalued
(5) Relationship to the real world
(6) New data types
11-3. Object Oriented Approach
11-4. Characteristics of OOP language
(1) Classes & objects
(2) Data abstraction and encapsulation
(3) Inheritance
(4) Polymorphism and overloading

(5) Creating new data types
11-5. Something about C++
(1) cout – output operator
(2) cin – input operator
11-6. Examples on C++
Exercises 11

Chapter 12 SPECIAL PROGRAMS

Appendix A FLOWCHART AND ALGORITHM

A-1. Introduction
A-2. Algorithm
A-3. Characteristics
A-4. Flowchart
A-5. Flowchart symbols
(1) Input & output
(2) Processor
(3) Terminal
(4) Decision maker
(5) Connecter
A-6. Computer flowcharting symbols
A-7. Arithmetic operators and comparators
A-8. Typical flowcharts

Appendix B BIT OPERATORS

B-1. Introduction
B-2. Bitwise operators
B-3. Bitwise logical operators
(1) Bitwise AND operator
(2) Bitwise OR operator
(3) Bitwise exclusive OR
B-4. Bitwise shift operators
(1) Left shift operator
(2) Right shift operators
B-5. Bitwise complement operator

Appendix C ASCII CHARACTER SET TABLE

C-1. Control character set
C-2. Printing character set
C-3. Extended ASCII character set

Appendix DOPERATORS PRECEDENCE TABLE

Appendix ESTANDARD LIBRARY FUNCTIONS

E-1. alloc.h E-7. graphics.h
E-2. conio.h E-8. math.h
E-3. ctype.h E-9. stdio.h
E-4. dir.h E-10.stdlib.h
E-5. dos.h E-11.String.h
E-6. io.h E-12.time.h

Index

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