HARBOUR, DOCK AND TUNNEL ENGINEERING

200.00

By R. SRINIVASAN

29th Edition 2018 (Paperback)
ISBN : 9789385039324
340 + 16 = 356 Pages
Size : 17 cm × 23.5 cm × 1.3 cm
Weight : 0.420 kg

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essential. This well-known text-book now in its twenty-ninth thoroughly Revised and Enlarged
edition, concisely formulates the basic principles of the subject matter in simple, lucid and easy
language presented in two sections.
Section I – Harbour and Dock Engineering
is well-divided in twelve chapters. It discusses the topics on Harbour and Ports; Natural Phenomena: Tides, Wind and Waves; Protection facilities: Mound Breakwater, Wall Type Breakwater, Special Type Breakwater such as Floating Type, Hydraulic Type and Pneumatic Type
Breakwater; Planning and Layout of Ports; Various other Facilities such as Docking Facilities;
Repairing Facilities; Approach Facilities; Loading Unloading Facilities; Storing Facilities; Dredging Facilities and Guiding Facilities.
Section II – Tunnel Engineering
is also well-divided in twelve chapters. It discusses the topics on General Aspects of Tunnelling;
Stages in Tunnel Construction; Shafts and Portals; Soil Classification and Various Tunnelling
Methods for Soft Soils; Tunnelling in Water Bearing Soils; Tunnelling in Rock; The New Austrian
Tunnelling Method (NATM); Tunnel Lining; Drainage of Tunnels; Lighting, Ventilation and Dust
Control in Tunnels; and Safety in Tunnel Construction.
The Salient Features of this book are
243 Self explanatory neatly drawn sketches, photographs and more than
321 examination questions at the end of each chapter.
The book in the present form will prove to be extremely useful to the students preparing for the
Degree examinations in Civil Engineering of all the Indian Universities, Diploma examinations
conducted by various Boards of Technical Education, Certificate Courses as well as for the
A.M.I.E., U.P.S.C., G.A.T.E., I.E.S., and other similar competitive and professional examinations. It should also be an immense use to practicing Civil Engineers.

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Weight 0.42 kg
Dimensions 17 × 1.3 × 23.5 cm
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Content

SECTION I : HARBOUR AND DOCK ENGINEERING
1 : HARBOURS AND PORTS
2 : NATURAL PHENOMENA : TIDES, WIND AND WAVES
3 : PROTECTION FACILITIES : MOUND BREAKWATER
4 : PROTECTION FACILITIES : WALL TYPE AND SPECIAL BREAKWATERS
5 : PLANNING AND LAYOUT OF PORTS
6 : DOCKING FACILITIES
7 : REPAIRING FACILITIES
8 : APPROACH FACILITIES
9 : LOADING UNLOADING FACILITIES
10 : STORING FACILITIES
11 : DREDGING FACILITIES
12 : GUIDING FACILITIES
SECTION II : TUNNEL ENGINEERING
13 : GENERAL ASPECTS TUNNELLING
14 : STAGES IN TUNNEL CONSTRUCTION
15 : SHAFTS AND PORTALS
16 : SOIL CLASSIFICATION AND TUNNELLING METHODS
FOR SOFT SOILS
17 : OTHOR METHODS OF TUNNELLING IN SOFT SOILS
18 : TUNNELLING IN WATER BEARING SOILS
19 : TUNNELING IN ROCK
20 : THE NEW AUSTRIAN TUNNELLING METHOD (NATM)
21 : TUNNEL LINING
22 : DRAINAGE OF TUNNELS
23 : LIGHTING, VENTILATION AND DUST CONTROL IN
TUNNELS
24 : SAFETY IN TUNNEL CONSTRUCTION
INDEX: HARBOUR AND DOCK ENGINEERING
INDEX: TUNNEL ENGINEERING

Content Details


SECTION I : HARBOUR AND DOCK ENGINEERING


Chapter 1 HARBOURS AND PORTS

1-1. Introduction
1-2. Water transportation
HARBOURS
1-3. Classification of harbours
1-4. Accessibility and size of harbours
PORTS
1-5. Ports
1-6. Indian Ports
1-7. Requirements of a good port
1-8. Facilities at a major port
1-9. Port Design
1-10. Ships – Ferry
QUESTIONS 1


Chapter 2 NATURAL PHENOMENA: TIDES, WIND AND
WAVES

2-1. General
2-2. Littoral drift
2-3. Sea water waves
2-4. Tide generation
2-5. Lunar tides
2-6. Solar Tides
2-7. Tides due to Moon and Sun
2-8. Total Number of Tides
2-9. Major tide
2-10. Water levels of sea during tides and tidal ranges
2-11. Uses of tides
2-12. Effect of tides
2-13. Age or establishment of tide
2-14. Tide prediction
2-15. Wind and waves
2-16. Dynamical effect of wave action
2-17. Modification of sea waves
2-18. Air compression
2-19. Water hammer
2-20. Shore protection works
QUESTIONS 2


Chapter 3 P R O T E C T I O N FA C I L I T I E S : M O U N D
BREAKWATER

3-1. General
3-2. Classification of breakwaters
3-3. Heap or mound breakwater
3-4. Selection of type of breakwater
3-5. Details of energy dissipation in mound breakwater
3-6. Characteristics of mound breakwater
3-7. Rubble mound breakwater
3-8. Concrete block mound breakwater
3-9. Rubble Mound breakwater Supplemented by concrete blocks
3-10. Rubble mound breakwater supplemented by patented stones
3-11. Mound with superstructure or Composite breakwater
3-12. Mound construction
QUESTIONS 3


Chapter 4 PROTECTION FACILITIES: WALL TYPE AND
SPECIAL BREAKWATERS

4-1. Wall type breakwater
4-2. Types of wall breakwater
4-3. Causes of failure
4-4. Forces on upright wall breakwater
4-5. Essentials for wall type breakwater
4-6. Advantages of wall breakwater
4-7. Disadvantages of wall breakwater

4-8. Typical cross-section of wall breakwater
4-9. Method of construction – staging system
4-10. Bonds
4-11. Wall type breakwater of larger units
4-12. Breakwater height
4-13. Breakwater failures
4-14. Comparison of mound type and wall type breakwaters
4-15. Special breakwaters
QUESTIONS 4


Chapter 5 PLANNING AND LAYOUT OF PORTS

5-1. General
5-2. Facilities at a port
5-3. Layout of ports
Questions 5


Chapter 6 DOCKING FACILITIES

6-1. General
6-2. Classification of docks
6-3. Classification of wet docks
6-4. Advantages and Disadvantages of tidal wet docks
6-5. Advantages and Disadvantages of enclosed wet docks
6-6. River ports
6-7. Form and arrangements of basins and docks
6-8. Design and construction of basin or dock walls
6-9. Other aspects of construction details
6-10. Dock entrances
6-11. Sizes of dock entrances
QUESTIONS 6


Chapter 7 REPAIRING FACILITIES

7-1. General
7-2. Classification of repairing facilities
7-3. Graving dry dock
7-4. Facilities to be provided at a graving dry dock
7-5. Method of dry docking
7-6. Size of graving dock
7-7. Forces acting on a graving dock
7-8. Conditions for design of graving dock
7-9. Scheme of constructing graving dock
7-10. Design of graving dock floor
7-11. Marine railway dry dock
7-12. Slipways
7-13. Lift dry dock
7-14. Floating type dry dock
7-15. Types of floating docks
7-16. Design considerations for floating docks
7-17. Advantages and disadvantages of floating dry dock
QUESTIONS 7


Chapter 8 APPROACH FACILITIES

8-1. General
8-2. Direction of an entrance
8-3. Direction of entrance for river harbours
8-4. Dimensions of entrances
8-5. Types of entrances
8-6. Entrance locks
8-7. Lock foundations
8-8. Dimensions of entrances and locks
8-9. Construction of lock gates
8-10. Forces on the gates
8-11. Shape of gates
8-12. Support for dock gates
8-13. Working of gates
QUESTIONS 8


Chapter 9 LOADING UNLOADING FACILITIES

9-1. General
9-2. Design of quay walls
9-3. Types of quay walls
9-4. Other details of quay walls
9-5. Wharves
9-6. Piers
9-7. Types of piers
9-8. Additional points for piers
9-9. Pierheads
9-10. Dolphins
9-11. Jetties
9-12. Differences between wharf and jetty
9-13. Fenders
9-13-1. Types of fenders
9-13-2. Classification of fenders
9-14. Slip
9-15. Moles
QUESTIONS 9


Chapter 10 STORING FACILITIES

10-1. General
10-2. Aprons
10-3. Transit sheds
10-4. Design of transit shed
10-5. Warehouses
10-6. Cold storages
10-7. Guard houses
QUESTIONS 10


Chapter 11 DREDGING FACILITIES

11.1. General
11.2. Primary dredging
11.3. Maintenance dredging
11.4. Disposal of the dredged material
11.5. Types of dredging devices
11.6. Choice of dredger
11.7. Execution of dredging work
QUESTIONS 11


Chapter 12 GUIDING FACILITIES

12-1. Necessity for Guiding Facilities
12-2. Fixed and floating light stations
12-3. Lighthouse
12-4. Signals
12-5. Light signals
12-6. Fog signal
12-7. Audible signals
12-8. Moorings
12-9. Mooring accessories
12-10. Off-shore moorings
QUESTIONS 12
SECTION II : TUNNEL ENGINEERING


Chapter 13 GENERAL ASPECTS OF TUNNELLING

13-1. General
13-2. Categories of obstacles
13-3. Definitions
13-4. Comparison of bypassing Alternatives Tunnel, Open cut, bridge
and surface road
13-5. Advantages and disadvantages of tunnels and open cuts
13-6. History of tunnels constructed
13-7. Developments in tunnelling methods
13-8. Important years in tunnel construction
13-9. Economics of tunnelling
13-10. Alignment of A tunnel

13-11. Classification of tunnels
13-12. Tunnel approaches
13-13. Shapes of tunnels
13-14. Size of tunnels
13-15. Problems in tunnelling
Questions 13


Chapter 14 STAGES IN TUNNEL CONSTRUCTION

14-1. Investigations at tunnel site
14-2. Setting out of tunnel
14-3. Methods of getting extra faces to work upon
14-4. Excavation
14-5. Blasting
14-6. Temporary supports
14-7. Permanent supports
14-8. Ventilation at the time of construction
14-9. Muck removal
14-10. Supplementary operations
14-11. Miscellaneous
QUESTIONS 14


Chapter 15 SHAFTS AND PORTALS

15-1. General
15-2. Advantages of shafts
15-3. Size of shafts
15-4. Location of shafts
15-5. Classification of shafts
15-6. Construction of shafts in rock
15-7. Construction of shaft in soft ground
15-8 Design of shaft supports
15-9. Precautions for shaft sinking work in soft soil
15-10. Protection round the shaft opening
15-11. Portals
15-12. Twin tunnels
QUESTIONS 15


Chapter 16 SOIL CLASSIFICATION AND TUNNELLING
METHODS FOR SOFT SOILS

16-1. Soil classification
16-2. Choice of method
16-3. Methods of tunnelling (soft soils)
16-4. Forepoling method
16-5. Needle beam method
16-6. Army method or case method
16-7. American method
16-8. English method
16-9. Belgian method
16-10. German method
16-11. Austrian method
16-12. Timbering in soft soil tunnelling
QUESTIONS 16


Chapter 17 OTHER METHODS OF TUNNELLING IN SOFT
SOILS

17-1. Liner plates method
17-2. Tunnelling with shield
17-3. Parts of shield
17-4. Terms commonly used with shield
17-5. Primary lining
17-6. General steps of tunnelling with shield
17-7. Shield tunnelling in different types of soils
17-8. Common Equipment with shield
17-9. Stages of using the shield
17-10. Mechanized shields
QUESTIONS 17


Chapter 18 TUNNELLING IN WATER BEARING SOILS

18-1. General
18-2. Well points system
18-3. Equipment with plenum process of tunnelling or compressed
air method
18-4. Various pipes and conduits
18-5. Compressors, generators and pumps
18-6. Methods of tunnelling in water bearing soils
Questions 18


Chapter 19 TUNNELLING IN ROCK

19-1. General
19-2. Sequence of operations for tunnelling in rock
19-3. Faces of operation for tunnelling in rock
19-4. Methods of tunnelling in rock
19-5. Mucking
19-6. Mucking in steep grade tunnelling
19-7. Hauling
19-8. Other aspects
19-9. Drill-bits
19-10. Nipper cars
19-11. Explosives
19-12. Safety precautions in rock tunnelling
QUESTIONS 19


Chapter 20 THE NEW AUSTRIAN TUNNELLING METHOD
(NATM)

20-1. General
20-2. NATM Concept
20-3. Main features of NATM
20-4. Details of NATM at LOKTAK
20-5. Review of Rock bolt system
20-6. Conclusions
Questions 20


Chapter 21 TUNNEL LINING

21.1. Necessity of lining
21.2. Objects of tunnel lining
21.3. Materials for lining
21.4. Design of thickness of lining
21.5. The sequence of lining a tunnel
QUESTIONS 21 300


Chapter 22 DRAINAGE OF TUNNELS

22-1. General
22-2. Pre-drainage
22-3. Dewatering
22-4. Permanent drainage
QUESTIONS 22


Chapter 23 LIGHTING, VENTILATION AND DUST CONTROL
IN TUNNELS

23-1. Tunnel Lighting
23-1-1. Spacing of lights
23-1-2. Types of tunnel lights
23-2. Ventilation in tunnels
23-2-1. Objects of tunnel ventilation
23-2-2. Requirements of tunnel ventilation
23-2-3. Volume of air required
23-2-4. Methods of ventilation
23-2-5. Equipment required for tunnel ventilation
23-2-6. Permanent ventilation
23-3. Dust control
QUESTIONS 23


Chapter 24 SAFETY IN TUNNEL CONSTRUCTION

24-1. General
24-2. Safety precautions in tunnelling
24-3. Health protection
Questions 24


Index : HARBOUR AND DOCK ENGINEERING

Questions 24


Index : TUNNEL ENGINEERING

essential. This well-known text-book now in its twenty-ninth thoroughly Revised and Enlarged
edition, concisely formulates the basic principles of the subject matter in simple, lucid and easy
language presented in two sections.
Section I – Harbour and Dock Engineering
is well-divided in twelve chapters. It discusses the topics on Harbour and Ports; Natural Phenomena: Tides, Wind and Waves; Protection facilities: Mound Breakwater, Wall Type Breakwater, Special Type Breakwater such as Floating Type, Hydraulic Type and Pneumatic Type
Breakwater; Planning and Layout of Ports; Various other Facilities such as Docking Facilities;
Repairing Facilities; Approach Facilities; Loading Unloading Facilities; Storing Facilities; Dredging Facilities and Guiding Facilities.
Section II – Tunnel Engineering
is also well-divided in twelve chapters. It discusses the topics on General Aspects of Tunnelling;
Stages in Tunnel Construction; Shafts and Portals; Soil Classification and Various Tunnelling
Methods for Soft Soils; Tunnelling in Water Bearing Soils; Tunnelling in Rock; The New Austrian
Tunnelling Method (NATM); Tunnel Lining; Drainage of Tunnels; Lighting, Ventilation and Dust
Control in Tunnels; and Safety in Tunnel Construction.
The Salient Features of this book are
243 Self explanatory neatly drawn sketches, photographs and more than
321 examination questions at the end of each chapter.
The book in the present form will prove to be extremely useful to the students preparing for the
Degree examinations in Civil Engineering of all the Indian Universities, Diploma examinations
conducted by various Boards of Technical Education, Certificate Courses as well as for the
A.M.I.E., U.P.S.C., G.A.T.E., I.E.S., and other similar competitive and professional examinations. It should also be an immense use to practicing Civil Engineers.

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